Food for Thought, or, Attempts on Kissing an Eating Disorder Goodbye

Fig and Thistle

Beatrice-Blocks-a-Binge

Losing weight and liking myself have been linked in my mind since I hit puberty at the tender age of 11. As a barely chubby and really just curvy girl of 15 I wouldn’t ride on roller coasters that went upside-down because I thought I would break them. I’d be racing along and over a bend and my weight would snap the bar and straps and I’d go plunging to my death. It didn’t matter that all the grown men on the ride were heavier. I was going to cause the disaster. I was going to die because I was just so fat. I’ve always seen myself as bigger. At 140 pounds I felt I looked like 300 pounds and somewhere along the way I actually became 300 pounds. Then I became more than 300 pounds. Part of that is from eating like a 300 pound person. I can eat…

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The heartbreak of creativity: a public service announcement

Drinking Tips for Teens

ross jobs A version of this piece originally aired on CBC Radio’s “Breakaway.” You can hear the original audio version here .

Hello, I’m Ross Murray, beloved columnist, salad dressing connoisseur and author of the best-selling self-help book Don’t Kid Yourself, Mister. Today, I’d like to talk about a condition that afflicts 2 out of 6 Canadians and in some areas as many as 1 in 3. I’m talking about… creativity.

Creativity can strike anyone, anytime, though probably not before 10 a.m. Creative people are just like you and me, except with weirder clothes and occasionally dubious hygiene. Creativity is a highly distracting affliction, but, with regular treatment and flattery, most creative people lead full, productive lives… Let me try that again: most creative people lead full lives.

There are two types of creativity. Some people are born creative, although early creativity remains difficult to diagnose. Many parents become convinced that their…

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What Will the Future Hold for Refreshingly Mature It Girl Lupita Nyong’o?

Flavorwire

A peek into Lupita Nyong’o’s Instagram feed is a wild look into the jet-setting life of the current It Girl: Paris with Rihanna, posing like Audrey Hepburn circa Roman Holiday with her Best Supporting Actress Oscar on the steps of the Dolby Theatre, hobnobbing with a who’s who of movie stars, and showing off a killer nail game, day by day. Lupita Nyong’o is having a moment, and it’s great. She’s the best fashion muse to come along in quite some time, the rare actress who’s able to make couture work for her. In the case of most actresses, the beautiful dress is wearing them; not so with Lupita. She was heartbreaking and wonderful in 12 Years a Slave. And, most impressively, she’s no ingenue. As Ann Friedman writes at The Cut, “The woman who’s just been declared the freshest young thing in Hollywood is just a few years away…

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Don’t Undermine Your Comment with a Plug

The Daily Post

We talk a lot about commenting — why it’s important, what makes a good comment, how to moderate a vibrant comments section.

There’s one surefire way to get your comment ignored or worse, deleted: leaving a shameless plug. If you’re going to take the time to visit others’ blogs and press the “comment” button, avoid this basic mistake.

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Teaching as Self-Sacrifice

Math with Bad Drawings

Like everyone else, I’m heir to the prejudices of my culture. So even though I know firsthand that teaching is a profession, on some level I see it as an act of self-sacrifice, as a hard path undertaken for the greater good.

This might not sound like a prejudice. Not a damaging one, anyway. It paints a generous portrait of teaching as noble and virtuous—a useful antidote to the too-common caricature of educators as lazy, union-fed bureaucrats. This ethic of “the greater good,” in fact, helped draw many of us into the profession. What we lack in salary and prestige, we make up for in civic-mindedness, in moral conviction, in feeling we’ve taken a high road through our professional life.

But all this high-mindedness has a dark underbelly. In painting the choice to teach as an act of self-sacrifice, I believe that we may harm our schools more than we…

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